Update README to make case and deaths definitions clearer
[repo] / README.md
index 1d15670..b3bd2e4 100644 (file)
--- a/README.md
+++ b/README.md
@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@ We are providing two sets of data with cumulative counts of coronavirus cases an
 
 The historical data files are at the top level of the directory and contain data up to, but not including the current day. The live data files are in the [live/](live/) directory.
 
-A key difference between the historical and live files is that the numbers in the historical files are the final counts at the end of each day, while the live files have figures that may be a partial count released during the day but cannot necessarily be considered the final, end-of-day tally..
+A key difference between the historical and live files is that the numbers in the historical files are the final counts at the end of each day, while the live files have figures that may be a partial count released during the day but cannot necessarily be considered the final, end-of-day tally.
 
 The historical and live data are released in three files, one for each of these geographic levels: U.S., states and counties.
  
@@ -104,21 +104,38 @@ In most instances, the process of recording cases has been straightforward. But
 
 For those reasons, our data will in some cases not exactly match with the information reported by states and counties. Those differences include these cases: When the federal government arranged flights to the United States for Americans exposed to the coronavirus in China and Japan, our team recorded those cases in the states where the patients subsequently were treated, even though local health departments generally did not. When a resident of Florida died in Los Angeles, we recorded her death as having occurred in California rather than Florida, though officials in Florida counted her case in their own records. And when officials in some states reported new cases without immediately identifying where the patients were being treated, we attempted to add information about their locations later, once it became available.
 
+* "Probable" and “Confirmed Cases and Deaths
+
+Cases and deaths can be reported as either “confirmed” or “probable.” Our total cases and deaths include both. The number of cases includes all cases, including those who have since recovered or died.
+
+On April 5, the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists [advised states](https://int.nyt.com/data/documenthelper/6908-cste-interim-20-id-01-covid-19/85d47e89b637cd643d50/optimized/full.pdf) to include both confirmed cases, based on confirmatory laboratory testing, and probable cases, based on specific criteria for testing, symptoms and exposure. The Centers for Disease Control adopted these definitions and national CDC data began including confirmed and probable cases on April 14.
+
+Some governments continue to report only confirmed cases, while others are reporting both confirmed and probable numbers. And there is also another set of governments that is reporting the two types of numbers combined without providing a way to separate the confirmed from the probable.
+
+The Geographic Exceptions section below has more details on specific areas. The methodology of individual states changes frequently.
+
 * Confirmed Cases
 
-Confirmed cases and deaths are counts of individuals whose coronavirus infections were confirmed by a laboratory test and reported by a federal, state, territorial or local government agency.
+Confirmed cases are counts of individuals whose coronavirus infections were confirmed by a laboratory test and reported by a federal, state, territorial or local government agency. Only tests that detect viral RNA in a sample are considered confirmatory. These are often called molecular or RT-PCR tests.
+
+* Probable Cases
+
+Probable cases count individuals who did not have a confirmed test but were evaluated by public health officials using criteria developed by states and the federal government and reported by a health department.
+
+Public health officials consider laboratory, epidemiological, clinical and vital records evidence.
+Tests that detect antigens or antibodies are considered evidence towards a “probable” case, but are not sufficient on their own, according to the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists.
 
-The number of cases includes all cases, including those who have since recovered or died.
+* Confirmed Deaths
 
-* "Probable" Cases and Deaths
+Confirmed deaths are individuals who have died and meet the definition for a confirmed Covid-19 case. Some states reconcile these records with death certificates to remove deaths from their count where Covid-19 is not listed as the cause of death. We follow health departments in removing non-Covid-19 deaths among confirmed cases when we have information to unambiguously know the deaths were not due to Covid-19, i.e. in cases of homicide, suicide, car crash or drug overdose.
 
-Probable cases and deaths count individuals who did not have a confirmed test but were evaluated using criteria developed by states and the federal government.
+* “Probable” Deaths
 
-On April 5, the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists Centers [advised states](https://int.nyt.com/data/documenthelper/6908-cste-interim-20-id-01-covid-19/85d47e89b637cd643d50/optimized/full.pdf) to include both confirmed cases, based on laboratory testing, and probable cases, based on specific criteria for symptoms and exposure. The Centers for Disease Control adopted these definitions and national CDC data began including confirmed and probable cases on April 14.
+Probable deaths are deaths where Covid-19 is listed on the death certificate as the cause of death or a significant contributing condition, but where there has been no positive confirmatory laboratory test.
 
-Some governments continue to report only confirmed cases, while others are reporting both confirmed and probable numbers. And there is also another set of governments that are reporting the two types of numbers combined without providing a way to separate the confirmed from the probable.
+Deaths among probable cases tracked by a state or local health department where a death certificate has not yet been filed may also be counted as a probable death.
 
-Please see the Geographic Exceptions section below for more details on specific areas, with the understanding that this changes frequently.
+For more on how states count confirmed and probable deaths, see this [article](https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/06/19/us/us-coronavirus-covid-death-toll.htmlhttps://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/06/19/us/us-coronavirus-covid-death-toll.html).
 
 * Dates